If there is one dish that the entire family loves and will gobble up not keeping track of numbers, it is the humble bhajji.. Deep fried vegetables that have been dipped generously in a batter made by gramma. She used to talk about how back when they were living as a joint family, there would be days when bhajji would be made in the evening, and they would fly.. 

Some of the veggies used are Chow chow, potato, raw banana, brinjal [grandpa and his brothers love this veg], cauliflower and onion…   even today there are times when gramma says “lets make bhajji”… except now quantity is limited cos everyone has become health conscious and we just make chow chow, cauliflower, onion and maybe raw banana… The batter is one thing she is super particular about- it needs to have the right consistency, enough amount of Asafoetida & chilli powder.. The veggies should be coated but there shouldnt be too much batter… So that is the memory I have of Bhajjis…



Few weeks ago three stooges piled into a car and headed down the beautiful East coast road towards Pondicherry. Along the way, they stopped at the Farm belonging to one stooge’s father in law. The farm was beautiful- acres of lush greenery, trees and plants of all kinds, including tomato, chilli [both big and small], mango, papaya, coconut and more. We spotted some dried up gum on what must have been a Cashew tree, coochicooed with the cows an calves, spotted some chicken and goat running around and enjoyed a refreshing tender coconut, bottoms up! 


When we left the place, we were given bags of vegetables and few coconuts as well. Each of us took some, and well, few days later  the stooge also sent across cute tiny bell peppers. And thus came the idea to make something of the Big chillies and these peppers.

I pulled out the packets of Kase cheese I had, and some home made paneer as well. Put them in separate bowls- added garlic to one, kasuri methi to the other and was all set to deep fry them green beauties.  Since it was for me & gramma, I made sure to fry the non garlic based ones first [she does not eat garlic]. 

Alongside these, I got the Bhajji batter ready – Besan flour, salt, red chilli and some garam masala as well. Mix it well with some water [just enough so it is pouring consistency, not too watery] You can also add Asafoetida and make it like the regular south indian bhajji batter…

A pan filled with enough oil was heating up on the stove as I got down to filling them chillies and peppers. It was fun! We usually make Bhajjis the traditional way, with no filling…  





Must say the final product turned out yummilicious.. We had it with lunch. The chillies had just a hint of heat, and the soft cheese inside had melted giving it a richness. Similarly, the peppers with paneer and kasuri methi were kick-ass, even if I do say so myself..  Gramma enjoyed it as well, so much so that she keep the remaining two aside saying “will have in evening or dinner, or will offer it to my cousin if he comes over”